Considering Homeschooling

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Considering Homeschooling?

considering homeschooling

First of all, homeschooling is legal in all 50 states.  Texas is very fortunate in that homeschools are considered private schools, and thus have no governmental oversight.

If you have a child in public school and wish to withdraw your child from public school, you must either go withdraw your child in person or send a letter of withdrawal by certified mail to the principal of the school. Your child will be considered truant until officially withdrawn from the school system!

Texas Homeschool Coalition has a section entitled “Getting Started”  that may answer many questions you might have. Texas Home School Coalition has a sample letter of withdrawal on its website.

Whether you mail a letter or withdraw in person, you DO NOT have to bring samples of your curriculum for the school to examine or approve.  Any such request is not legal. If you find you are being harassed by mail or telephone by public school officials, you should send in a letter of assurance, and any further harassment is not legal.

This is the official Supreme Court of TX ruling on homeschooling:

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF TEXAS NO. D-2022 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY ET AL., PETITIONERS
V. GARY W. LEEPER ET UX. ET AL., RESPONDENTS
ON APPLICATIONS FOR WRIT OF ERROR TO THE COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE SECOND DISTRICT OF TEXAS JUSTICE HECHT DELIVERED THE OPINION OF THE COURT, IN WHICH CHIEF JUSTICE PHILLIPS, JUSTICE HIGHTOWER, JUSTICE DOGGET, JUSTICE CORNYN, JUSTICE GAMMAGE, JUSTICE ENOCH, AND JUSTICE SPECTOR JOIN, AND IN PARTS I, II AND III OF WHICH JUSTICE GONZALEZ JOINS,

All school-age children in Texas are required to attend public schools a minimum number of days each year unless exempted by law.

TEX. EDUC. Code § 21.032. Among those exempt from this requirement is “any child in attendance upon a private or parochial school which shall include in its course a study of good citizenship”. Id. § 21.033(a)(l).

The dispute in this class action centers on whether the private school exemption includes children who are taught at home, in a bona fide manner, a curriculum designed to meet certain basic education goals, including a study of good citizenship.

The district court construed the exemption to include such children and permanently enjoined all school districts and their attendance officers from enforcing the compulsory attendance law based upon any other reading of § 21.033(a)(l).